Monthly Archives

March 2009

Arpeggios

Minor 11 Arpeggios

March 21, 2009

The minor 11 arpeggio is worth learning but not something you will use all the time. You can use the minor eleven arpeggio over most minor chords. The minor 11 arpeggio has five notes.

There intervals of the minor 11 arpeggio are

1 b3 5 b7 11

Below I have written out the minor 11 arpeggio in all 12 keys for you to practice.

C minor 11 arpeggio

C Eb G Bb F

Db minor 11 arpeggio

Db E Ab B Gb

D minor 11 arpeggio

D F A C G

Eb minor 11 arpeggio

Eb Gb Bb Db Ab

E minor 11 arpeggio

E G B D A

F minor 11 arpeggio

F Ab C Eb Bb

Gb minor 11 arpeggio

Gb A Db E B

G minor 11 arpeggio

G Bb D F C

Ab minor 11 arpeggio

Ab B Eb Gb Db

A minor 11 arpeggio

A C E G D

Bb minor 11 arpeggio

Bb Db F Ab Eb

B minor 11 arpeggio

B D Gb A E

I hope you enjoyed learning the sound of the minor eleven arpeggio and find a place for it in your improvisations.

Arpeggios

Major 9 Arpeggios

March 20, 2009

Welcome to another installment of our jazz arpeggio series. In this lesson we will be focusing on the major 9 arpeggio. The major 9 arpeggio is a useful 5 note arpeggio that can add a lot of melodic interest when playing over major 9 chords. You can also use arpeggio substitution to find more interesting ways of using the major 9 sound.

The intervals of the major 9 arpeggio are

1, 3, 5, 7, 9

Below I have written out the major 9 arpeggio in all twelve keys

C Major 9 Arpeggio

C E G B D

Db Major 9 Arpeggio

Db F Ab C Eb

D Major 9 Arpeggio

D F# A C# E

Eb Major 9 Arpeggio

Eb G Bb D F

E Major 9 Arpeggio

E G# B D# Gb

F Major 9 Arpeggio

F A C E G

Gb Major 9 Arpeggio

Gb Bb Db F Ab

G Major 9 Arpeggio

G B D F# A

Ab Major 9 Arpeggio

Ab C Eb G Bb

A Major 9 Arpeggio

A C# E G# B

Bb Major 9 Arpeggio

Bb D F A C

B Major 9 Arpeggio

B D# F# Bb C#

Uncategorized

Dominant 7b5 Arpeggios

March 8, 2009

So far in our series of articles we have looked at the most common arpeggios and how to use them in your jazz playing. We will continue this tour of arpeggios by taking a look at the dominant 7b5 arpeggio. The dominant seven flat five arpeggio is an obvious candidate for playing over 7b5 chords and it contains four notes, the root, major third, flat fifth and the flat seventh.

We can write out the intervals of the dominant 7b5 arpeggio like this

1, 3, b5, b7

Below I have written out the dominant 7b5 arpeggio in all 12 keys.

C Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

C E Gb Bb

Db Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

Db F G B

D Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

D F# Ab C

Eb Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

Eb G A Db

E Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

E G# Bb D

F Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

F A B Eb

Gb Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

Gb Bb C E

G Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

G B Db F

Ab Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

Ab C D Gb

A Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

A C# Eb G

Bb Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

Bb D E Ab

B Dominant 7b5 Arpeggio

B D# F A

I hope you enjoy learning the unique sound of the dominant 7 flat five arpeggio and that you can find a place for it in your jazz improvisations. Practice playing the 7b5 arpeggio in all keys to improve both your ears and technique.

Standards

Blue Bossa Chord Progression

March 8, 2009

Blue Bossa by Kenny Dorham is a great jazz standard to play over and contains a very nice chord progression that is suitable even for beginners. Blue Bossa is usually one of the first jazz standards that people learn to improvise over. Blue Bossa is written here in the key or C minor. There is only really one A section to this tune. It starts in C minor and modulates up a half step to Db major. Once you have learned the melody and chord changes to Blue Bossa you will need to know how to improvise over it.

Below I have written out the chord changes to Blue Bossa

Blue Bossa Chords

Cm7 | Cm7 | Fm7 | Fm7 |

Dm7b5 | G7alt | Cm7 | Cm7 |

Ebm7 | Ab7 | Db | Db |

Dm7b5 | G7alt | Cm7 | Dm7b5 G7alt |

There are several ways you could approach improvising over the Blue Bossa chord progression. The first four bars are all taken from the C natural minor scale and you can use the C natural minor to play over the Cm7 and Fm7 chords.

Cm7 | Cm7 | Fm7 | Fm7

Bar 5 and 6 give us a minor 2 5 progression that is best handled by playing the C harmonic minor scale.

Dm7b5 | G7alt

Bar 7 and 8 return to the C natural minor scale.

Cm7 | Cm7

In bars 9 to 12 we have a 2 5 1 in Db major. The easiest way to play over this part would be to use the Db major scale over these four bars.

Ebm7 | Ab7 | Db | Db

In bars 13 and 14 we have another minor 2 5 progression which can be tackled using the harmonic minor scale

Dm7b5 | G7alt

Bar 15 briefly returns to the C natural minor scale

Cm7

Bar 16 is a short minor 2 5 progression and you can use the C harmonic minor scale over this section

Dm7b5 G7alt

As you can see we can play over the Blue Bossa chord progression using only three scales: the C natural minor scale, the C harmonic minor scale and the Db major scale.

If you want to make your solos sound more interesting then you should really try and highlight the sound of the G7alt chords in this progression by using the altered scale over them. You can do this by playing the Ab melodic minor scale over the G7alt chords. You could also try playing through the Blue Bossa chord progression using only arpeggios to really nail the sound of the changes in this tune. I hope you have fun learning the Blue Bossa chord progression. It is one of the easiest jazz standards to play over and a really great tune to have in your repertoire.

Chord Theory

7th Chords

March 8, 2009

Welcome this lesson on seventh chords. Seventh chords are probably the most common chord types used in jazz harmony and in this article I will show you how seventh chords are built and how you can use them in your own playing.

Triad Chords

Let’s start by looking at the simplest type of chord, the triad chord. I think it is worth quickly reviewing triad chords because all seventh chords are simply triad chords with an extra note added. A triad chord always has three notes and there are three types of triad chord, major, minor and diminished.

Major Triad

The major triad chord has three notes 1, 3, 5. A C major triad for example would have the notes C, E, G.

Minor Triad

The sad sounding minor triad is made up of three motes 1, b3, 5. A C minor triad for example would have the notes C, Eb, G

Diminished Triad

The diminished triad is a dark sounding chord made up from the notes 1, b3, b5. A diminished triad in the key of C for example would have the notes C, Eb, Gb.

Seventh Chords

Now that we have a better understanding of how triad chords are built, we can take a look at adding one extra note to the triad to form a seventh chord. Seventh chords can be found from a scale by moving up in thirds. Take a look at the example below which shows how you find a seventh chord from the C major scale. You should notice that there is a clear pattern here. You start on C, skip one note to get to E, skip one note to get to G, skip one note to get to B. The chord we form here is a Cmaj7 chord.

C D E F G A B

We can do the same thing and follow the same pattern to form all of the 7th chords of the major scale. Take a look at this example which starts on the D note of the C major scale and produces a Dm7 chord. You are simply starting on D, skipping one note to get to F, skipping one note to get to A and finally skipping one more note to get to a C. You can start on any note of a scale and use this pattern to find 7th chords.

D E F G A B C D

Major 7th Chords

A major 7th chord has four notes and is built from a major triad and an added major seventh note. A major 7th chord has the notes 1, 3, 5, 7. As an example, a major 7th chord in the key of C would contain the notes C, E, G, B.

Minor 7th Chords

A minor 7th chord has four notes and is built from a minor triad and an added minor seventh note. A minor 7th chord has the notes 1, b3, 5, b7. As an example, a minor 7th chord in the key of C would contain the notes C, Eb, G, Bb.

Dominant 7th Chords

A dominant 7th chord has four notes and is built from a major triad and an added flat seventh note. A dominant 7th chord has the notes 1, 3, 5, b7. As an example, a dominant 7th chord in the key of C would contain the notes C, E, G, Bb.

Minor 7b5 Chords

A minor 7b5 chord has four notes and is built from a diminished triad with an added flat seventh note. A minor 7b5 chord has the notes 1, b3, b5, b7. As an example, a minor 7b5 chord in the key of C would contain the notes C, Eb, Gb, Bb.

Harmonizing The Major Scale

We can harmonize the major scale and produce seventh chords. Take a look below to see the harmonized C major and G major scales that show you which seventh chords make up the major scale:

C Major (7th chords)

Cmaj7, Dm7, Em7, Fmaj7, G7, Am7, Bm7b5

G Major (7th chords)

Gmaj7, Am7, Bm7, Cmaj7, D7, Em7, F#m7b5

I hoped you enjoyed learning about seventh chords. You will need to know a bit about these chords because they come up time and time again in all kinds of music. There is nothing complicated about seventh chords. Seventh chords are simply triad chords with an extra note added to them.

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